Vitamin E

 

Vitamin E

Vitamin E is a fat-soluble vitamin, which plays a role as an antioxidant in the body. It balances cholesterol, fights free radicals and prevents disease development, repairs damaged skin, thickens hair, balances hormones, helps PMS symptoms, improves vision, helps people with Alzheimer's disease, improves effects of some medical treatments such as radiation and dialysis, and improves physical endurance and muscle strength. The recommended dietary allowance (RDA) of Vitamin E is, according to age : 6 mg/day (9 IU) for 1 – 3 years children , 7 mg/day (10.4 IU) for 4 – 8 years ;11 mg/day (16.4 IU) for 9 – 13 years ; 15 mg/day (22.4 IU) for 14 years and up females; 15 mg/day (22.4 IU) for pregnant women; 19 mg/day (28.5 IU) for breastfeeding women and 15 mg/day (22.4 IU) for males. Vitamin E deficiencies are rare and it is almost never caused by a poor diet. There are specific situations that may lead to a vitamin E deficiency. A premature infant or people who have an issue with their dietary fat level ( cystic fibrosis, gastric bypass, malabsorption problems such as Crohn’s disease, liver disease, or pancreatic insufficiency) are at risk of deficiency. Deficiency symptoms include loss of muscle coordination, and impaired vision and speech. Supplementing with very levels of Vitamin E could potentially lead to the following health concerns: heart failure in people with diabetes, worsening bleeding disorders, increasing the chances that head, neck, and prostate cancer will return, increasing bleeding during and after surgery and increasing chance of death after a heart attack or stroke.

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